Wyoming Liberty Group

We here at the Wyoming Liberty Group strive to bring you the latest information. Please enjoy the blogs and comment on them often.

Public Records and Meetings Compromise Threatened

by JP Eichmiller

All indications heading into Wednesday’s Joint Judiciary Interim Committee in Sundance signaled that a compromise between state media and public employees had been reached over the redrafting of Wyoming’s public records and meetings statutes.

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Sunshine in Wyoming Government

by JP Eichmiller

Wyoming press representatives are hoping to reach a compromise with local agency officials by the end of August on disputed legislation regarding open records and meetings.

The Wyoming Senate rejected two House bills during the 2011 Legislative Session intended to provide greater transparency and access to government information and meetings.

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Key Liberty Votes 2011 Discussion

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Key Liberty Votes 2011

For the second year in a row, Charles Curley has compiled Key Liberty Votes, which will now be a yearly installment in the Wyoming Liberty Group’s Liberty Brief publication. This document serves as a quick-reference guide to how each Wyoming legislator respected liberty in the 2011 Legislative Session.

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Civility in the Wyoming Legislature

by Charles Ware

If you have sat in the gallery in either the Wyoming House or Senate you have heard debates on bills using rather unusual language.  For example, “I agree with the good senator from Converse County;”  “On and against the bill;”  “I rise in support of the bill;” and “This is a friendly amendment.”  You may only be able to identify a legislator by seeing him, knowing his voice, or knowing the geography of the state, because legislators in debate do not address one another by name.  This keeps debate focused on the topic and prevents deterioration into personal opinions or personal attacks.   And this is the way it should be.  The Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate go to great lengths to school freshmen legislators in the “Legislative Rules of Civility.”  A legislator can surely disagree with an amendment or with a bill, and he can do so within the rules.  Again, by way of example, “I strongly disagree with the good Representative from Fremont County,” or “I oppose this bill.”

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