Wyoming Liberty Group

We here at the Wyoming Liberty Group strive to bring you the latest information. Please enjoy the blogs and comment on them often.

Boyd Wiggam serves as staff attorney with the Wyoming Liberty Group focusing on property rights, local government, and land use planning and zoning issues. He previously worked as a civil litigation attorney and for various businesses serving farmers and landowners in Laramie County. Wiggam, a Wyoming native, was raised on a farm in Eastern Laramie County , received an undergraduate degree from the University of Wyoming, did graduate coursework in Community and Regional Planning at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and received his law degree from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He is an active member of both the Wyoming State Bar and Virginia State Bar.

Burns Bans Flowers in Cemetery

Burns, a small town in eastern Laramie County, has demonstrated how even small town governments can ride roughshod over people and disregard the history and foundation of a community. Both Veterans Day and my mother’s birthday are approaching as I write. Either of these normally would be an occasion to place flowers at the graves of my mother and my grandfather who was a World War II veteran. However, because they are buried in the Burns cemetery, this basic act of remembrance is not permitted.

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PlanCheyenne Requires Public Input

Today (Thursday, October 10), private citizens in the greater Cheyenne area have a prime opportunity to engage in the open-minded civil communication with government officials.

Two Open House events are scheduled for individuals or groups to submit “ideas about priority actions for the future.” The first open house event is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Laramie County Library. A second community meeting is scheduled in the evening from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Laramie County Community County Training Center Building.

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Cheyenne’s Overgrown Landscape Requirements

Regulations requiring folks to plant trees and grow lawns? Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? But that’s precisely what Cheyenne’s current ordinance mandates. The Cheyenne City Council recently bungled an opportunity to rectify this craziness by voting against an ordinance that would have modified the existing landscaping mandates.

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Procedural Fix Urgently Needed in Cheyenne Development Code

Recently, I wrote about the City of Cheyenne Planning Commission’s failure to adhere to procedural rules and how that undermines the rule of law. At the Monday, September 16 meeting, the Planning Commission devoted a great deal of its time to discussing how to handle two needed text amendments to the Unified Development Code (UDC) while following procedural rules to the letter. This discussion showed great progress by the Planning Commission in adhering to the letter of the law.

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Property Owners Must Have the Freedom to Conserve Water

The Cheyenne City Council has an opportunity to protect both private property rights and the supply of water available for productive household or business uses. To accomplish this amazing feat of helping both economic development and the environment, all the council needs to do is adopt Councilman Shanor’s proposed amendment to the landscaping provisions of the Unified Development Code (UDC). However, both the city’s Planning Commission and administration are reluctant to cede regulatory authority back to private property owners—even if doing so could help combat problems caused by water shortages that periodically plague the region.

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Federal Light Bulb Follies

During the Laramie County Commission’s discussion last week about whether to accept a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to participate in an Airport Sustainable Master Plan Pilot Program, those in attendance were treated to a nice reminder of how misguided environmental crusades can be.

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A Good Day for the Free Market in Wyoming

At their respective August 20 meetings, the Casper City Council and the Laramie County Commission voted in favor of applicants seeking to open businesses that will compete with existing businesses in the two communities. In both cases, the governing bodies were asked to limit the ability of the applicants to do business on the basis that new entrants to the marketplace will disrupt existing business(s). Thankfully, both governing bodies seem willing to accept that the marketplace, and not government, should make the final decision on which businesses remain in business.

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